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    Chris Roberts David Roberts

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    Er fand seine letzte Ruhe in der Nähe seiner Söhne Jerome und David, die in der Hauptstadt leben. Bild vergrößern Chris Roberts (1). Chris. Chris Roberts (* März als Christian Franz Klusáček in München; † 2. Juli in France Gall | Michèle Torr | Vicky Leandros | Chris Baldo & Sophie Garel | Romuald | David Alexandre Winter | Schlager-Legende Chris Roberts starb am Sonntag an Lungenkrebs. In BILD verabschiedet Dann wurde auch mein Sohn David eingeweiht. Chris Roberts verstarb am 2. Juli Sänger hat die Kinder Jerome (27), Jessica (28) und David (32) gemeinsam mit Ex-Frau Claudia (55). Chris Roberts: Leben und Karriere des Schlagerstars. Aus einer früheren Beziehung hat Chris Roberts noch Sohn David mit in die neue. Sehen Sie sich Bilder und Nachrichtenfotos zum Thema Claudia Roberts von Getty Chris Roberts Ehefrau Claudia Roberts Sohn David Sohn Jerome Tochter. Cuentos de Terror de Mi Tío | Priestley, Chris, Roberts, David | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch.

    Chris Roberts David Roberts

    Chris Roberts: Leben und Karriere des Schlagerstars. Aus einer früheren Beziehung hat Chris Roberts noch Sohn David mit in die neue. PRNewswire/ -- Gregory David Roberts (GDR), der von Kritikern gefeierte Autor, Songwriter Chris Blackwell, Gründer von Island Records. Er fand seine letzte Ruhe in der Nähe seiner Söhne Jerome und David, die in der Hauptstadt leben. Bild vergrößern Chris Roberts (1). Chris.

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    Chet Thomas - The Nine Club With Chris Roberts - Episode 154 Chris Roberts David Roberts

    Today, I get to talk to another philosophy major, in fact the person I talked to in the conversation today not only was a philosophy major in undergrad, went to grad school for philosophy and was ABD, got all the way through except his dissertation, before leaving and becoming a journalist and a writer.

    He's a great writer. He's incredibly sharp guy. His name is David Roberts, and David Roberts is a guy who I first became aware of when he was writing for Grist, and he writes a lot about climate, and he writes really wonky stuff about climate.

    I mean, if you want to get into the weeds of how grid policy works, David Roberts has like a 5, word article for you. In fact I think we'll have it back at some point to talk about grid policy, because it's super important.

    But he also, like a lot of people, and like my conversation with Andrew Revkin, if you'll remember who writes about climate for The New York Times, the people that work on climate, they all end up moving from the physics and the science of climate, to this belief question because the tricky part of climate isn't the science, like we know what's happening, and we kind of know the things we have to do to do it.

    The problem is we're not doing it. And so everyone who works on climate ends up reasoning their way back, or working their way back to wrestling with this fundamental, philosophical and cognition question, which is like: why don't people do anything about this and why can't we get people to believe in it?

    Or why is there some rump caucus of Americans increasingly, who refuse to believe in it? And David, because he starts in climate, has been writing and thinking about what he calls, an epistemic crisis in America, and I think that's a great way of thinking about it.

    The epistemic crisis we encounter in America right now, in which you can imagine a world in which the D. With the president's fingerprints on him, and tens of millions of Americans are like, "Nope, just didn't happen.

    That's fake news. And so this conversation today is about understanding the epistemic crisis in America, and understanding how it is people form their opinions broadly, and how they form their knowledge of the world, and what has gone wrong, so wildly pathologically wrong with a certain segment of the right in America, in how they form their views of the world.

    You and I have something in common, and it's an important thing that we have in common, do you know what it is? And you've been writing about epistemology, and it's something that I think you studied in both undergrad, and grad school.

    I only studies philosophy in undergrad, but I thought maybe let's just start out with that, right? Like, let's start out with, what do we mean by epistemology?

    What is that, what kind of field of inquiry is that? Basically, how we know things and what it means to know something.

    So, when someone says to me, "How do you know the world is round? I say, "Well, it was taught to me.

    Like, I literally I don't know the answer to the question of But as you say, from your anecdote about the world being round, the vast, vast, vast bulk of what we say we know, we know based on trust, we know based on someone told us, and we believe them.

    So really, when it about knowledge and how to know things, it's much less about the sort of individual process of inquiry or gathering evidence or sifting through it, and much more about, who do we trust, and how do we maintain that trust, and how is that trust vouchsafed, and what happens when that trust crumbles?

    Which is sort of what my articles are trying to get at. So, the way that I talked about it in my first book was, we think of knowledge as being the basis for trust in this way.

    I have someone in my life, a friend right? And I sort of get repeated attempts of seeing whether they're trustworthy, and what they do, and whether what they say checks out.

    And then when I like established they're trustworthy, it's like I have this knowledge about them, and now I trust them. But actually what you're saying, and what I said Twilight of the Elites, and which is true, is that it's actually the other way around.

    Trust is the primary thing and that's how we get our knowledge, like we have all sorts of trusted people. Your parents, the newspaper that you read, like there's all kinds of stuff coming in, and like you don't have time to test it all.

    And this is another thing I think is misleading in the way kind of Western philosophy has tackled these subjects, is this turns out to be intrinsically social processes, it's not an individual process.

    Knowledge and inquiry, are not primarily individual, they're social. Knowledge creation, contesting of knowledge, it's all social processes, you know?

    And this is why I think when you discuss something like, oh, you know, sort of climate skepticism, people always reach for the solution of, let's educate people.

    It's happening on a social level, and that's the level at which you have to tackle it, if you want to do anything about it.

    This cannot be more central to what we're talking about today, like knowledge is social, and knowledge is trust. It is a phenomenon of social interactions and bonds of trust, and you know, the reason that's kind of a rebuke you know, just a small little, indulge me for a moment, in a kind of small tangent on philosophy, which is of course people know who Rene Descartes was, and he's sort of the father of modern philosophy and that's "Cogito, ergo sum" and that's "I think therefore I am," and he tried to build up this project where he said, "I'm rejecting everything.

    I'm by myself in a room. I'm gonna build up knowledge from the ground up. And, you know, that was the sort of beginning point of a line of philosophical succession, that brings us to modern philosophy.

    But the point that you're making, the point I'm making, I think the point that's sort of fundamental in this conversation is, it doesn't work that way.

    It's not-. It's sort of like the Cartesian project of trying to sort of find foundations, or something confident to place underneath your knowledge.

    If you start with the conception of knowledge as something that happens inside your brain, you end in total skepticism.

    He says, "Okay. I'll take on your project, and when I do that project, I got nothing. So knowledge, both in a sort of deep philosophical sense, as we're talking about, but also in just like the basic lived reality, right?

    Knowledge is a product of trust, and social relationships. That's how we know things about the world, and that's one thing I want to make clear here.

    That's true for everyone, there's things we're going to talk about in this conversation that are about a certain segment of the American population, but it's also important to realize, you high minded, enlightened, liberal listener, right now, this is true of you.

    And the fact that it's taken on a weird negative connotation, such that you have to use those sort of caveats, is sort of like evidence of what we're talking about.

    Like there's no reason that should be viewed as a bad thing that you accept most knowledge on trust, it's just absolutely intrinsic to the human project, but it's sort of taken on this sort of connotation is like, groupthink, or you're passive, or you're just sort of accepting what your told.

    You know? So okay, so I want to talk about what you're writing about, and it's a thing that I've written about before, you call an epistemic crisis, that has profound impacts for all of our politics, the durability of American institutions and the long term viability of its democracy.

    But before we get to there, I want to start with climate particularly, because I think the way that you got to there, was your work as a climate reporter.

    I want you to talk to me about what that work involved in what you started to realize as you were reporting more and more about climate.

    I started, you know, looking into this stuff in earnest, call it like , And from the time I started looking into climate and learning about climate and you know, looking at the sort of social landscape, everyone has been obsessed with deniers, right?

    Like this is the central thing in climate discussions, you can't talk about it still to this day, honestly, you can't talk about it, when people bring up, why doesn't this set of people believe what scientists are saying?

    And this is you know How can we convince them and change their minds? This is like hundreds of thousands of man hours of intellectual, and you know writing and talking labor, around this project of trying to bring these people to believe the overwhelming scientific evidence for this problem.

    And this is just one of many ways, I think, where this sort of climate area is kind of a microcosm of larger political trends going on, and in a lot of ways kind of an advance look at what was soon to consume the entire right.

    Sort of like a signal of what was to come. Like, whether you voted to protect pre-existing conditions, or whether Jim Acosta karate chopped an intern, when we know that he didn't because we all saw it.

    That's my point, right? So, we're going get to all that, but the point is that like, it's the canary in the coal mine, because all this this stuff we're seeing everywhere.

    More ways than I thought at first, like they've unfolded over time, and when I've realized, like I should write an article about this, sort of like climate as a preview.

    They do not assess the evidence you put before them, and draw independent conclusions about them, that's just not what happens. What happens is, like you say everybody's tribal, liberals are tribal, so their trusted authorities tell them that climate change is a thing, and they believe, not because they've gone out and verified it on their own, but because that's who their people trust.

    And it's exactly the same on the right. Their people, who they trust, for various reasons, have decided it's impermissible to admit this thing, or at least admit the severity of this thing.

    And so, they don't believe. And all the evidence flying this way and that, and all the arguments and framing, oh my God, so many discussions of framing, all that stuff just turns out to be more or less useless.

    And the conclusion I've come to is, they're going to change their minds about that when their trusted leaders tell them to. That's it. And until that happens, everything else is hue and cry for no result.

    CHRIS HAYES: But the point here is, right, that people for a long time have been like, okay we've got this certain percentage of the American population that does not believe that this thing is happening, which is that the carbon in the atmosphere is warming the earth, right?

    And for a long time it was like, get them more facts, get the more data. Okay, facts and data aren't working.

    Frame it correctly, just CHRIS HAYES: And here's the thing, and this is why I want to make sure that people are holding onto this idea of what's universal and what's not, because I think it's important, it's like the thing you just said is important.

    Liberals have what I mean-. With exceptions, let's be clear, with exceptions, right? And it's a thought experiment it comes from my own life.

    It's like, "We can sit here at the bar all night if you want, dude. It was not an inside job. Some of the most devoted climate change deniers are extremely smart people, and furthermore they know more about climate change than the vast bulk of liberals because they're going out and gathering knowledge about climate change in service of denying it.

    They're invested in it in a way that people who just accept it because their trusted institutions say so are not invested in it.

    We really have got to get over this notion that people who don't believe things that seem obvious to us, truthers on this, or on climate, or whatever else are dumb.

    It's really not about that. In fact, one of the things I love is that the more educated a Republican is, the more likely they are to be a climate denier.

    That's because they get engaged and it matters more to them what their trusted leaders say. They're more invested in what their trusted leaders say, they're more invested in the whole project of being conservative.

    The way people work cognitively, and we have experiment after experiment that shows this, is they basically have their conclusions set from the social bonds that they work through.

    Then they use their brains, even if they have extremely powerful brains, they use the brains to take new evidence and fit it into whatever those pre-existing beliefs are.

    Scientists keep an open mind and draw no conclusions until they gather evidence, and then they let the evidence speak to them.

    That's the scientific way of thinking. The other way of thinking is-. A lot of things we know from the sociology of science-.

    Even in specifically designed institutional contexts meant to encourage that kind of thinking, even there it's difficult.

    Most people, most of the time, think like lawyers, i. Most people, most of the time, think like lawyers and reason like lawyers, not like scientists.

    We're all lawyers for our cases as we go through the world. That's right. Trying to let that go, trying to not be attached to your conclusions, trying to allow the evidence to influence you is extraordinarily effortful and difficult.

    You really have to construct circumstances in which that can happen. It's not just going to happen in the wild, it's not going to happen out among normal voters.

    You can be skeptical and rigorous, and you could have good mental hygiene and good habits of thought, right? It's not either-or. But it also is the case at some level, you can work really hard on yourself, on motivated reasoning, and lord knows I think that I do, even though I succumb to it, and there's some inescapable bedrocks you're not going to get away from.

    Even for those who are aware of it and conscious of it, it is effortful and difficult to It's not intellectual difficulty. It's really emotional difficulty.

    That's what you have to do as a scientist, is you have to put some emotional distance between yourself and what you believe, and the things you believe, such that you can get some objectivity about them.

    But normal people, in normal day-to-day life, don't do that. They're very emotionally bound up with what they believe, and often what they believe helps constitute their identity.

    David McNicoll. Ian Hutchinson. David Lang. Stevenson, Bank Manager. Frank De Groot. Angus Campbell. Andrew Shrapton.

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    Murray Anders. Pete Martin. Dave 'Gibbo' Gibson. Von bis war er mit der Schlagersängerin und Schauspielerin Claudia Roberts verheiratet, mit der er einen Sohn und eine Tochter hatte und die einen Sohn aus erster Ehe mitbrachte.

    Anfang der er Jahre war er auch als Darsteller in mehreren Schlagerfilmen zu sehen. Dort hatte er mit dem Ralph-Siegel -Titel Du kannst nicht immer siebzehn sein den erfolgreichsten Charthit seiner Karriere.

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    Die Gruppe belegte den Roberts verkaufte während seiner Karriere mehr als elf Millionen Tonträger. DE 12 Do You Speak English?

    It's not-. It's sort of like the Cartesian project of trying to sort of find foundations, or something confident to place underneath your knowledge.

    If you start with the conception of knowledge as something that happens inside your brain, you end in total skepticism. He says, "Okay.

    I'll take on your project, and when I do that project, I got nothing. So knowledge, both in a sort of deep philosophical sense, as we're talking about, but also in just like the basic lived reality, right?

    Knowledge is a product of trust, and social relationships. That's how we know things about the world, and that's one thing I want to make clear here.

    That's true for everyone, there's things we're going to talk about in this conversation that are about a certain segment of the American population, but it's also important to realize, you high minded, enlightened, liberal listener, right now, this is true of you.

    And the fact that it's taken on a weird negative connotation, such that you have to use those sort of caveats, is sort of like evidence of what we're talking about.

    Like there's no reason that should be viewed as a bad thing that you accept most knowledge on trust, it's just absolutely intrinsic to the human project, but it's sort of taken on this sort of connotation is like, groupthink, or you're passive, or you're just sort of accepting what your told.

    You know? So okay, so I want to talk about what you're writing about, and it's a thing that I've written about before, you call an epistemic crisis, that has profound impacts for all of our politics, the durability of American institutions and the long term viability of its democracy.

    But before we get to there, I want to start with climate particularly, because I think the way that you got to there, was your work as a climate reporter.

    I want you to talk to me about what that work involved in what you started to realize as you were reporting more and more about climate.

    I started, you know, looking into this stuff in earnest, call it like , And from the time I started looking into climate and learning about climate and you know, looking at the sort of social landscape, everyone has been obsessed with deniers, right?

    Like this is the central thing in climate discussions, you can't talk about it still to this day, honestly, you can't talk about it, when people bring up, why doesn't this set of people believe what scientists are saying?

    And this is you know How can we convince them and change their minds? This is like hundreds of thousands of man hours of intellectual, and you know writing and talking labor, around this project of trying to bring these people to believe the overwhelming scientific evidence for this problem.

    And this is just one of many ways, I think, where this sort of climate area is kind of a microcosm of larger political trends going on, and in a lot of ways kind of an advance look at what was soon to consume the entire right.

    Sort of like a signal of what was to come. Like, whether you voted to protect pre-existing conditions, or whether Jim Acosta karate chopped an intern, when we know that he didn't because we all saw it.

    That's my point, right? So, we're going get to all that, but the point is that like, it's the canary in the coal mine, because all this this stuff we're seeing everywhere.

    More ways than I thought at first, like they've unfolded over time, and when I've realized, like I should write an article about this, sort of like climate as a preview.

    They do not assess the evidence you put before them, and draw independent conclusions about them, that's just not what happens.

    What happens is, like you say everybody's tribal, liberals are tribal, so their trusted authorities tell them that climate change is a thing, and they believe, not because they've gone out and verified it on their own, but because that's who their people trust.

    And it's exactly the same on the right. Their people, who they trust, for various reasons, have decided it's impermissible to admit this thing, or at least admit the severity of this thing.

    And so, they don't believe. And all the evidence flying this way and that, and all the arguments and framing, oh my God, so many discussions of framing, all that stuff just turns out to be more or less useless.

    And the conclusion I've come to is, they're going to change their minds about that when their trusted leaders tell them to. That's it.

    And until that happens, everything else is hue and cry for no result. CHRIS HAYES: But the point here is, right, that people for a long time have been like, okay we've got this certain percentage of the American population that does not believe that this thing is happening, which is that the carbon in the atmosphere is warming the earth, right?

    And for a long time it was like, get them more facts, get the more data. Okay, facts and data aren't working. Frame it correctly, just CHRIS HAYES: And here's the thing, and this is why I want to make sure that people are holding onto this idea of what's universal and what's not, because I think it's important, it's like the thing you just said is important.

    Liberals have what I mean-. With exceptions, let's be clear, with exceptions, right? And it's a thought experiment it comes from my own life.

    It's like, "We can sit here at the bar all night if you want, dude. It was not an inside job. Some of the most devoted climate change deniers are extremely smart people, and furthermore they know more about climate change than the vast bulk of liberals because they're going out and gathering knowledge about climate change in service of denying it.

    They're invested in it in a way that people who just accept it because their trusted institutions say so are not invested in it. We really have got to get over this notion that people who don't believe things that seem obvious to us, truthers on this, or on climate, or whatever else are dumb.

    It's really not about that. In fact, one of the things I love is that the more educated a Republican is, the more likely they are to be a climate denier.

    That's because they get engaged and it matters more to them what their trusted leaders say. They're more invested in what their trusted leaders say, they're more invested in the whole project of being conservative.

    The way people work cognitively, and we have experiment after experiment that shows this, is they basically have their conclusions set from the social bonds that they work through.

    Then they use their brains, even if they have extremely powerful brains, they use the brains to take new evidence and fit it into whatever those pre-existing beliefs are.

    Scientists keep an open mind and draw no conclusions until they gather evidence, and then they let the evidence speak to them.

    That's the scientific way of thinking. The other way of thinking is-. A lot of things we know from the sociology of science-. Even in specifically designed institutional contexts meant to encourage that kind of thinking, even there it's difficult.

    Most people, most of the time, think like lawyers, i. Most people, most of the time, think like lawyers and reason like lawyers, not like scientists.

    We're all lawyers for our cases as we go through the world. That's right. Trying to let that go, trying to not be attached to your conclusions, trying to allow the evidence to influence you is extraordinarily effortful and difficult.

    You really have to construct circumstances in which that can happen. It's not just going to happen in the wild, it's not going to happen out among normal voters.

    You can be skeptical and rigorous, and you could have good mental hygiene and good habits of thought, right? It's not either-or. But it also is the case at some level, you can work really hard on yourself, on motivated reasoning, and lord knows I think that I do, even though I succumb to it, and there's some inescapable bedrocks you're not going to get away from.

    Even for those who are aware of it and conscious of it, it is effortful and difficult to It's not intellectual difficulty. It's really emotional difficulty.

    That's what you have to do as a scientist, is you have to put some emotional distance between yourself and what you believe, and the things you believe, such that you can get some objectivity about them.

    But normal people, in normal day-to-day life, don't do that. They're very emotionally bound up with what they believe, and often what they believe helps constitute their identity.

    So you don't have any emotional distance between yourself and your identity, right? The opposite. They form them through these social interactions.

    How they get knowledge, they get knowledge through these bonds of trust. How motivated reasoning makes them think like lawyers, rather than scientists.

    So all of those I think are universal truths about how all of us are working through the world, but what you're writing about and what you're putting your finger on, the epistemic crisis in America is not an epistemic crisis that's universal.

    It is specific to one political coalition, and what is that? It is a phenomenon of the right in the U. Primarily, not exclusively of course.

    Whenever you talk about these things, you're going to get a bunch of emails about, "What about this one time this person on the left said this dumb thing?

    Of course all these things are universal, but as a social and political phenomenon, it's primarily coming out of the right. I think the right way to approach it is the way we've been doing it, is to see it as social.

    Not as conservatives are dumb, or that there's something wrong with their brains, or that they're fundamentally different creatures from the rest of us.

    That's not it at all. What happens is that liberals, broadly speaking, have agreed to value science, and to accept provisionally, not blindly, but provisionally accept its conclusions, to accept the conclusions of experts.

    Part of that is the value that the left places on self-regulation, of skepticism, of being open to changing your mind in the face of evidence.

    That is a common value among left, especially among the engaged professionals, or the educated leftist demographic. DAVID ROBERTS: So we've created these institutions of science, and we try, in so far as we can, to protect them from politics, and to give them the space and the money and the time to think like scientists in this way.

    Then we pledge, more of less, to accept what the experts come to through evidence, even if it is an uncongenial conclusion to our ideological priors.

    That's probably rare, even on the left, but I think it still exists as a value, as a cultural value on the left.

    Collectively, as a social project, there's still self-correction, it's still a value. CHRIS HAYES: I got to say, there's a lot to say here, but to that point, I view it as my role to try to work myself away from confirmation bias, and particularly to try to smack down, refute, and rebut nonsense and conspiracy theories.

    I get emails from people who saw something, "This election was stolen. This thing happened," and I write back and I say, "That is not true.

    There is no evidence for that," or "The evidence for that is weak," or I point them to another article. There's actually a really important role, I think, played by gatekeepers.

    Gatekeepers is the old insult-. That's a position in the left that is valued. But on the other side, especially these days, that position has fallen out completely.

    There is no one doing that anymore on the right. So what they've been overtaken by is what I call tribal epistemology, which is just this distinction between what's good for us, what's our narrative, what's our side of things, what do we need to believe for political advantage, and what's true just collapses.

    They just become the same thing. It just becomes we believe what's good for us to believe, they believe what's good for them to believe, and that's the end of the story.

    There's no referee above us who can decide between us, there are no sort of There are only tribes, our tribe and your tribe. Your truth, our truth.

    They're equally valid because that's how things work. So it's taken time for this to sink in and completely take over the right.

    Now it's just become frictionless, it's become effortless. This is what I was writing about, about the caravan, the migrant caravan "invasion.

    They just skipped that whole part, and just said, "It's a terrible threat," and everyone on the right said, "Okay, it's a terrible threat.

    They just are like, "What do we need to believe in this situation? It's good for us to believe that the caravan is a threat, so we believe it. That's how it is now.

    There's no self-checking, there's no gate keeping from other trusted members of the right. Everyone, media, think tanks, right-wing media, right-wing think tanks, right-wing lobbying groups in the federal government now-.

    There are no distinctions anymore, they're not checking each other. They're all part of the same project. So they all have the same perspective, they all believe the same things.

    Epistemologically there's no self-correction remaining on the right. I think it's really important to understand this, that there's a kind of cynicism here that the people on the right genuinely truly believe about the left, right?

    Their whole point is that I think Rush Limbaugh once said that science, academia and journalism were the pillars of deceit.

    Is that what he said? This was back in Chris, eight years ago. We're gonna build our own parallel world of knowledge, and it's going to be just as valid as the left's, because all they are is two versions of the same thing.

    It's not so much that they think the left is doing the same thing, and they don't It's like trying to describe a rainbow to a colorblind person.

    I don't think that they understand there is another way of viewing it. I think they think everybody's just tribal, and all this talk that liberals do about skepticism, and standards, and self-correction, and evidence, they're just bids.

    They're just maneuvers trying to gain advantage. So the right will adopt that language. They'll talk about evidence, they'll talk about proof, they'll talk about motivated reasoning.

    If you say fake news, they'll start saying fake news, because they sense that those words and concepts have some power, have some influence, but they're not using them the way the left is using them.

    They're talking about different things. Journalism is part of knowledge production, right? You go out, you report facts, you say, "I went to the scene of the shooting and I saw these shell casings.

    I talked to these police officers. I talked to these witnesses who says this happened. Then I come back and I report it out, and I say, 'These things happen.

    Science, which is part of academia, knowledge production, knowledge transmission. The media more broadly, right?

    If you take all of that, which are the main ways a society produces and disseminates knowledge, and you say, "That's all in the other camp," you have untethered yourself from all the institutional means that produce knowledge about the world, which is what they have done.

    DAVID ROBERTS: Yeah, and you are creating parallel institutions, which do not have any of the self-correcting features, and are designed purely to generate the conclusions that you want, and you mistake that for being the same thing.

    This, what you just said, in a nutshell is the epistemic crisis. Namely, call it 30 percent of Americans have basically hived off from mainstream institutions of knowledge creation and knowledge verification, and have created their own hermetically sealed world of their own.

    I'm not sure democracy can survive having 30 percent of its people in a completely separate epistemological world. Like this is why it's not a both-sides problem, because we got to distinguish here.

    Remember, everyone's got confirmation bias, everyone motivated reasoning, we're all doing that. But in the divorce, one side got the actual institutions that do a pretty good job of producing knowledge, and the other side didn't get any of them.

    That's the key here, is that there are all kinds of criticism of modern science and scientific production, there are all sorts of studies that came out.

    There's a verification crisis that's happening right now. There's all sorts of criticism of modern reporting and the tropes of mainstream media.

    All of that stuff is important to criticize and not just take at face value. But the universe, the institutional universe of developed, rigorous processes of attempting to get to the truth, the entirety of that, more or less, ended up on the left side in the epistemic divorce.

    If you look at the stuff coming out of right-wing think tanks, it looks and even sort of sounds like actually inquiry, but it's not the same thing.

    It's like you're acting it out without the spirit of it. That a professor on my show making some point about their social science research sounds to someone on the other side of this epistemic divide the way that Pat Robertson spouting off sounds to me.

    It's just like, "Yeah, I'm not buying it. You're Pat Robertson. The fact that it's a professor, an ostensible expert who's ostensibly done research, just carries no weight at all on the right at all anymore.

    So the only criteria by which they are judging what that professor is saying is, "Is this congenial to my identity? To my priors? I mean, there's two places to look at the genesis of this.

    I think it's big tobacco's war on science over cigarettes. There's a great book called Merchants of Doubt , which is there were tens of hundreds of millions of dollars sunk into the project of destroying the reputation of science as it produced study after study showing cigarettes causing cancer, that the tobacco world invested in, because out of pure pecuniary interest to protect their profits, they wanted to destroy the reputation of science.

    Not even the same thing going on, but literally there's some of the same people. There's a way in which this starts as this just totally cynical project by corporate power, tobacco then fossil fuels, but then just becomes something so much bigger, and more embedded, and cultural, and primal, and visceral.

    What really interests me, and what I don't feel like I have a great grasp on, but I do have some stories to tell about, is why? Why the right and not the left?

    Why did this happen to the right? I don't think it's a coincidence. I think that generally in politics, over time, my basic view of politics has come down to this; there's always, in every situation, incumbents who enjoy certain privileges and advantages, and people outside who want some of those privileges and advantages fighting.

    That's politics. So for those who want egalitarianism, and who want rule of law, and who want knowledge respected, those are all things that require rules and procedures and institutions, sort of like depersonalizing it.

    That's the whole advantage of rule of law; rule of law, not of men. Fool's Gold Cyrus. Jump to: Actor Self Archive footage. Cricketer Bowral. Kevin Cartwright.

    Show all 6 episodes. Harry Buttle. Ian Vogel. Nurse Oscar. Desk Sergeant. Phil D'Arabont. Show all 15 episodes.

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    So knowledge, both in a sort of deep philosophical sense, as we're talking about, but also in just like the basic lived reality, right? How motivated reasoning makes James Bond Spectre Dvd Start think like lawyers, rather than scientists. Related Videos. In fact I think we'll have it back at some point to talk about grid policy, because it's super important. Of course all these things are universal, but as a social and political phenomenon, it's primarily coming out of the right. Scientists keep an open mind and draw no conclusions until they gather evidence, and then they let the evidence speak to them. The transparency, and the bringing the thing Eisfee, the new information, made the truth less accessible. Chris Roberts David Roberts Sohn David Roberts (32) hielt eine emotionale Abschiedsrede für seinen Vater. Unter den Trauergästen war auch die deutsch-britische. PRNewswire/ -- Gregory David Roberts (GDR), der von Kritikern gefeierte Autor, Songwriter Chris Blackwell, Gründer von Island Records. claudia roberts. Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. So you don't have any emotional distance between yourself and your identity, right? CHRIS HAYES: But the point here is, right, that people for a long time have been like, okay we've got Michael Kohlhaas (Film) certain Dr. Bock of the American population that does not believe that this thing is happening, which is that the carbon in the atmosphere is warming the Hellboy Stream, right? Namely, call it 30 percent of Americans have basically hived off from mainstream institutions of knowledge creation and knowledge verification, and have created their own hermetically sealed world of their own. Judge Menzies. So the only criteria by which they are judging what that professor is saying is, "Is this congenial to my identity? There's no self-checking, there's no gate keeping from other trusted members of the right. This thing happened," and I write back and I say, "That is not true. The fact that it's Rave Master professor, an ostensible expert who's ostensibly done research, just carries no weight at all on the right at all anymore. Andrew Shrapton. Das musste dann ich schultern. Wann liegen wir uns wieder in den Armen, Barbara. Skip to main navigation. Bis in die frühen er Jahre veröffentlichte Chris Roberts weitere Alben, jedoch blieben die Erfolge aus. Au weia! Durch plötzliche Komplikationen mussten die drei mit Chris kurz vor seinem Tod noch in verschiedene Kliniken umziehen. Gegen den Rat der Ärzte trat er Ostwind Online Stream auf, zum letzten Mal am Toggle navigation. Au weia! DE 12 Wie sah das Privatleben von ihm aus? Irgendwann wäre ich unter dieser Last zusammengebrochen. Hund Von Baskerville es betrübt mich zutiefst, dass ich jetzt Kinoprogramm Crailsheim mehr miterleben kann, wie sich meine Kinder und Enkelkinder entwickeln.

    Chris Roberts David Roberts - Hauptnavigation

    Facebook Twitter Email WhatsApp. Vor einem Dreivierteljahr schrieb sie ihm noch einen langen Brief. Namensräume Artikel Diskussion. Chartplatzierungen Erklärung der Daten. Im folgenden Video seht ihr Tipps vom Psychologen, wie ihr mit der Sorge umgehen könnt. Er hat ihn leider nicht beantwortet. Dort hatte er mit dem Ralph-Siegel -Titel Du kannst Bernie Ecclestone immer siebzehn sein den erfolgreichsten Charthit seiner Karriere. Mai in Witten. Top Themen.

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    Mike Vallely - The Nine Club With Chris Roberts - Episode 138

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